Saturday, July 18, 2009

Something Is Afoot

well acd wrote something.
moi? arty?
in a way it's drifting, shuttling, that's what they do do, maybe.
we should all be so lucky to meet a twain and mark it as a time to get off a shuttle and walk away.

imageSir Arthur Conan Doyle had Sherlock Holmes quote various renowned personalities in many of his stories. For example, Sherlock Holmes quotes Edgar Allen Poe in two stories.


Edgar Allan Poe
USA - Scott #986
imageIn A Study in Scarlet, Holmes' companion, Dr. Watson, says, "it is simple when you explain. You remind me of Edgar Allan Poe's Dupin. I had no idea that such individuals did exist out of stories." Poe is considered to be the father of the modem detective story.
imageHolmes says in The Case of the Resident Patient, "you remember that some time ago when I read to you that passage in one of Poe's sketches in which a close reasoner follows the unspoken thoughts of his companion, you were inclined to treat the matter as a tour de force of the author." Later during investigation of The Cardboard Box, Holmes repeated the same thought to Dr. Watson.
imageSherlock Holmes is familiar with the writings of William Shakespeare despite Dr. Watson's assessment that Holmes knowledge of literature is "Nil" (A Study in Scarlet). However, Holmes quoted Shakespeare from 14 of his plays in various cases. One of the most well known expressions [from "The Adventure of the Abbey Grange"] is "Come, Watson, come. The game is afoot." This comes from Henry V, act III, scene 1.
imageHolmes has a habit of rephrasing several Shakespeare quotes such as, "Thrice is he armed that hath his quarrel just" (Henry IV, part 2 act III, scene 2). In the disappearance of Lady Carfax, Holmes states: "Thrice is he armed who hath his quarrel just."

Tension filled the musty room as Professor Moriarty threw six decks of playing cards onto the large oak table. "Sit!" he ordered. "I'm in a sporting mood. We'll play six hands of bridge, and if you go plus on each one, I'll set you free."
imageSherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson had been investigating the theft of the Crown Emerald and were seized by Moriarty's henchmen. They were now being held captive in the basement of the arch villain's home. "And if we don't?" Holmes inquired.
"That's easy, Mr. Holmes. You and your bumbling doctor friend will be my guests for lunch. I've just installed a brand new piranha tank, and the August heat is making the little buggers voracious. Anyone for bridge?"
"Hardly seems fair," Watson grumbled. "I've only played bridge a few times. Can't we make it gin rummy?"
image"Come, Watson, come! The game is afoot," instructed Holmes, then he whispered in his friend's ear, "Just bid only minor suits, or double with a good hand. Try to make yourself dummy - that shouldn't be too hard."

"Then, let's begin." Moriarty grinned. "The cards have already been shuffled, so I'll deal each hand to save time. Colonel Moran? I know you're not a bridge player, but sit down as my partner and just pass. Holmes? You sit here on my right." As fate (or the Professor's evil design) would have it, Holmes became declarer on each deal.

Funny to be arch sometimes.

"you actually got me re-reading A Study in Scarlet last night - Holmes doesn't seem to think much of either Poe or his Dupin"